Avery

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Avery

The first Euro-American settlement of the area now known as Avery was by Joseph and Sarah Goodell, pioneer operators of the hotel and stagecoach relay station. In the 1850s they built a four-room house for a hotel and family home which was later incorporated into the present Avery Hotel. It was called the Half-Way House, so named because it was halfway between Murphys and the Calaveras Big Tree. Following the discovery of the Comstock Lode in 1858, Half-Way House became a busy way-station on the route of the Big Tree-Carson Valley Road, used extensively as an overnight stop by logging and freighting teams.

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Native American Settlement of Avery

Although ethnographic Native American sites have not been specifically recorded for Avery, there is ample evidence of villages in the area. C. Hart Merriam, visiting the area ca. 1905, mentioned the village of Yoong’-ah-ko-te, located one mile below Avery. According to the Kelsey Census of Native Americans, there were 50 Me-Wuk in residence in Avery in 1905-1906. Taber records a population of 60 persons at a “rancheria” located at Avery in 1911.

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